Offa's Dyke Path

A walk following King Offa's Dyke from Chepstow to Prestatyn along the England-Wales border.

3 to 17 nights
25-177 miles
Moderate / Demanding to Demanding / Strenuous

From £255 per person

About The Trail

During the 8th century, King Offa of Mercia ordered a great dyke to be built to mark the western boundary of his kingdom with Wales. The Offa's Dyke Path follows the course of this ancient earthwork from Chepstow to Prestatyn, passing through scenery of great beauty and variety along the way.

The trail visits a succession of historic border towns and attractive villages including Monmouth, Hay-on-Wye and Welshpool. There is also plenty of historic interest along the trail, including Chepstow Castle, the ruin of Tintern Abbey and the imposing stronghold of White Castle, to name just a few.

We offer multiple holiday options along this trail. If you wish to walk the entire trail, simply select the first option from the list below.

Trail running available

We also organise trail running holidays along this trail. Visit Contours Trail Running Holidays.

Customer reviews from the Offa's Dyke Path

“We all enjoyed the walk very much. An excellent variety of paths and views. It was all good.”
Mr Newton, UK
“A demanding 4 days but all arrangements went well. Fabulous countryside.”
Mr Ambler, UK
“Offa's Dyke is spectacular and I thoroughly recommend the Southern section.”
Ms Tasnady, UK
“Everything went well - even the weather cooperated.”
Mr Catton, USA
“Really nice walk, not over-challenging. Very rural, not much between each stop and the next. The instructions and advice were well.”
Mr Short, UK
“Beautiful country, great hosts, well-marked path. Very, very enjoyable.”
Mr Kirchner, USA
“This is a brilliant route with so much history, beautiful and varied scenery and lots of friendly people on the way.”
Ms Wassermann, UK
“We had a fabulous time and were very pleased overall.”
Mr Winter, USA
“It was a fabulous walk – lovely hills, exhilarating ridges, extensive views and even a couple of aqueducts for good measure.”
Mr Owens, UK